Monday, December 2, 2013

Blog Tour with Giveaway: Jonathan Lister's CROSSROADS



Yay!  It's tour time!!!

Today I'm excited to share a great new author, Jonathan Lister, with you!
Ready?  Let's get started!!! And don't forget to enter the giveaway at the end, too!



Werewolf. Bar bouncer. Dad. Standard traits for any self-respecting, reformed criminal, living under the radar in Demos City. For Leon Gray, normal is what he wants — for himself and his not-yet-changed teenage daughter.

Playing bodyguard to crusading reporter David Hastings would totally ruin Leon’s peace, especially since Hastings has hired killers on his trail, pros who know how he takes his espresso in the morning, and where Leon lives.

The payoff, though, would fill up Shauna’s empty college fund, and in a battle between opportunity and ordinary, money wins. He just has to keep Hastings alive long enough to cash the check.

If only he didn’t have to save his daughter, too.

As a budding wolf, she’s piqued the interest of a local pack Alpha — one Leon knows will steal Shauna right out from under him the first chance he gets.

Leon isn’t about to give up on his daughter or Hastings, and will fight for both longer than it took Demos City to see werewolves as equals to humans.

He can only hope it doesn’t take a thousand years.


Want more?  How about a sneak peek???

The Bouncer 

Breaking a beer bottle over someone’s head rarely knocks them unconscious. Oh, it’s going to hurt like hell, probably make a good-sized gash in the scalp but hardly ever just a quick dose of shut-eye. What they’ll end up with is a wound that looks a lot worse than it actually is. The best an opponent can hope for is the element of surprise and the moments of disorientation that the hit causes. If the bastard is serious about it, he can use the jagged edges of broken glass to do some real damage. A shame this isn’t a Western. When a beer bottle connects with a cowboy’s head in one of those old movies, he hits the floor in a few seconds.

I’m not a cowboy. I’m something else.

“Gray! Watch out!” Jenny shouts from behind the bar, but I already know Frank is coming. Guy lost his job last week—ten years as a call center supervisor. He’s been in here every night since. Now he’s drunk enough to think I’m the reason his company shipped his job off to the Philippines.

It’s taking him forever to swing that damn bottle at me; I’m getting bored.

He’s harmless on most nights, talks a lot about how he’d like to blow up his old work, but ends up passing out in his car. People in front of me are pointing and shouting over the din of music and bar talk, obviously trying to warn me. It’s the whiskey’s fault Frank is coming after me. That doesn’t mean I can make an exception. Everyone in here knows the rules, knows what’s coming.

The bottle connects with the back of my head and shatters. I don’t move. Broken glass sticks in my hair, even draws some blood. I let the pain run down my back along with the cheap beer and hold my breath until the shouting sting fades to a grumbling throb.

Yep—hurts like hell.

“Fuck you, Leon!” Frank shouts. His breath is acrid and brimming with rye as it washes over my neck. Its scent tells me how much alcohol is in his blood. In all the movies Frank has ever probably seen, it’s only supposed to take one hit, so I know he’s is waiting for me to fall down. In fact, he’s probably praying I fall because no way he’s got a next move planned.

A bar that was roaring with life a moment ago is all spectators, front-row seat types. Most everyone in here knows me, knows what I am. Frank does, too; it’s why he needs to quit the whiskey. The pool tables are quiet. No one’s playing darts, not even bringing glasses to their lips. There are no footsteps on the hardwood floors. The customers are all a mixture of bloodlust and pity, waiting to see what my first move is going to look like. The bell sounds in my head as I turn around.

This is the fun part of my job.

Add CROSSROADS to your Goodreads TBR here.
Purchase CROSSROADS here: Amazon or Barnes & Nobles

Let's get to know this awesomesauce writer:

Jonathan Lister is a full-time writer with work appearing in outlets of USA Today, The Houston Chronicle and many others. A graduate of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University, he’s waited an unspeakable amount of tables en route to having the career he wants, and the ability to the tell stories he loves. Crossroads: aDemos City Novel is Jonathan’s first book-length work of fiction. He currently lives in the Philadelphia area and continues to drink too much coffee.

Stalk this cool author on his author's site, Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads page.

Here's what Jonathan had to say about overcoming writer's block:

Writer’s block is a lie. The blockage isn’t in the flow of words – we can keep writing for as long as our fingers keep jabbing at the keys. Our problem isn’t with production, but the awful sentences that come out of us, sometimes for months, before we get to the good stuff. Avoiding this ‘blockage’ is at the forefront of every writers’ process, and it’s on the menu for mine as well. At the risk of discussing the craft too in-depth, here are a few ways I keep the keys popping and the ideas coming.

#1 Alcoholism
That’s not true. I mean, I don’t advocate abusing a substance as a means to stimulate your creativity, but it is good to get out of the house and interact with other humans. See your friends for a drink, go out with your significant other for a glass of wine, anything, other than sit at your desk and continue to pound sand. Don’t get addicted to booze because I told you it would help your career. Get out there and socialize, but do so in moderation. 



#2 Write The Crap Out of It
We tend to toil under the notion that “the draft” is just going to pour out of us in one creative convulsion. It’s not true…at least not for most us. In reality, you just need to write a bunch of terrible lines before you get your brain in the right place to write some good ones. If you’re still coming up with boring prose, don’t worry. As the old saying goes, “If you find yourself going through Hell, keep going.”

#3 Video Games…No Seriously
Get out of your headspace and allow your brain to ease into another reality. No legal way of doing that better than with video games. Fire up the X-box, the PC or the Playstation, set the difficulty on “child with a rattle” and destroy your competition. The goal here is not to increase your frustration level, so don’t go MMo’ing in the heroic-level raids where your progress descends into herding cats and punching online trolls. Be liberal with your trigger finger, grasshopper.



#4 Walk the Dog
Remember your dog? The animal you feed and take care of that lounges near your writing desk waiting for a head pat and/or belly rub? He needs attention, so why don’t you quit worrying about the chapter you just can’t get right and go for a walk? The steady motion will help relax you, trust me. Of course, if you have a cat, this step will only serve to infuriate you further. You can’t own a cat. You can only agree to feed it for the time it chooses to live with you.

#Call Your Best Friend
Conversation is a clot-busting drug for the logjam of ideas in your brain. Give your best friend a call and hash them out. Don’t censor yourself or avoid story points because you’re not confident in them. This is your closest friend, the person who knows you better than anyone. Let the musings fly back and forth. Sooner rather than later, you’ll know which parts are lame and which ones are worth investing more time in.

Everyone works through creative problems differently. What works for you, might not be what generates the inspiration for another, and that’s totally okay. Next time when you don’t feel like writing, or doing anything else for that matter, give one of these tips a try. You might be shocked at the results. 

 Ready for the giveaway???

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